Slice of life
Slice of life
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nihophoenix:

ボカロコンピレーションアルバム「-THE BAD-」のジャケットイラストを描かせて頂きました。http://www.nicovideo.jp/watch/sm23336148
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awesomedigitalart:

Soothsayer by Stephen-0akley
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adamstennett:

Adam Stennett. Drink. 2007. Oil on wood, 72 x 72 inches
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emengel:

Lady of the Lake for @Sketch_Dailies. 
It feels like forever since I did an art that was “painterly”… so this was fun. Takes a lot longer though.
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akibin:

blackyjunkgallery:

i’ve juste arrived at tokyo, so i didn’t have the time to really work and i’m still waiting for my desk. My current work station is cute, but not very fonctionnal. So today, just a little sketches.I hope better next time fellows !

living the dream….
akibin:

blackyjunkgallery:

i’ve juste arrived at tokyo, so i didn’t have the time to really work and i’m still waiting for my desk. My current work station is cute, but not very fonctionnal. So today, just a little sketches.I hope better next time fellows !

living the dream….
akibin:

blackyjunkgallery:

i’ve juste arrived at tokyo, so i didn’t have the time to really work and i’m still waiting for my desk. My current work station is cute, but not very fonctionnal. So today, just a little sketches.I hope better next time fellows !

living the dream….
akibin:

blackyjunkgallery:

i’ve juste arrived at tokyo, so i didn’t have the time to really work and i’m still waiting for my desk. My current work station is cute, but not very fonctionnal. So today, just a little sketches.I hope better next time fellows !

living the dream….
akibin:

blackyjunkgallery:

i’ve juste arrived at tokyo, so i didn’t have the time to really work and i’m still waiting for my desk. My current work station is cute, but not very fonctionnal. So today, just a little sketches.I hope better next time fellows !

living the dream….
akibin:

blackyjunkgallery:

i’ve juste arrived at tokyo, so i didn’t have the time to really work and i’m still waiting for my desk. My current work station is cute, but not very fonctionnal. So today, just a little sketches.I hope better next time fellows !

living the dream….
akibin:

blackyjunkgallery:

i’ve juste arrived at tokyo, so i didn’t have the time to really work and i’m still waiting for my desk. My current work station is cute, but not very fonctionnal. So today, just a little sketches.I hope better next time fellows !

living the dream….
akibin:

blackyjunkgallery:

i’ve juste arrived at tokyo, so i didn’t have the time to really work and i’m still waiting for my desk. My current work station is cute, but not very fonctionnal. So today, just a little sketches.I hope better next time fellows !

living the dream….
akibin:

blackyjunkgallery:

i’ve juste arrived at tokyo, so i didn’t have the time to really work and i’m still waiting for my desk. My current work station is cute, but not very fonctionnal. So today, just a little sketches.I hope better next time fellows !

living the dream….
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artforadults:

miranda-meeks submitted
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Into the Forest by illustrator Miranda Meeks.
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awesomedigitalart:

Motherland Chronicles #15 - mother by tobiee
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awesomedigitalart:

Lena’s Tempest by wylielise
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marchingelephants:

Holy shit baby chameleons are so cute!!!
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moonlessgown:

re-upload! let’s start fresh
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formfollowsfunctionjournal:

World War II Aircraft Nose Art
formfollowsfunctionjournal:

World War II Aircraft Nose Art
formfollowsfunctionjournal:

World War II Aircraft Nose Art
formfollowsfunctionjournal:

World War II Aircraft Nose Art
formfollowsfunctionjournal:

World War II Aircraft Nose Art
formfollowsfunctionjournal:

World War II Aircraft Nose Art
formfollowsfunctionjournal:

World War II Aircraft Nose Art
formfollowsfunctionjournal:

World War II Aircraft Nose Art
formfollowsfunctionjournal:

World War II Aircraft Nose Art
formfollowsfunctionjournal:

World War II Aircraft Nose Art
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oldbookillustrations:

Shantanu meets the goddess Ganga.
Warwick Goble, from Indian myth and legend, by Donald Alexander Mackenzie, London, 1913.
(Source: archive.org)
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kidicarusiscrazy:

Yoshitaka Amano
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nothingbutthedreams:

ryanpanos:

Inhabiting Infrastructures: Indian Stepwells | Socks Studio
The stepwells are generally storage and irrigation tanks in which sets of steps must be descended in order to reach for water and maintain the well itself. These structures are mostly common in western India and in arid regions of South Asia where they provide regular supply in regions affected by heavy seasonal fluctuations in water availability.
The stepwells, (the erliest date to 600 AD), essentially appear as infrastructural monuments for water collection, huge artifacts somewhere between landscape and architecture sunken in the earth. They are usually composed of two constant elements, a well and an access route: the well collects monsoon rain percolating through layers of fine silt (to filter particulates), eventually reaching a layer of impermeable clay. The second elements, the staircases, are descended to reach water and allow the use of the infrastructure. There are no two identical stepwells, as each one of them, – about 3000 were built -, reveals specific features in the shape and in the decorative motives; in some cases the stepwells host galleries and chambers around the well.

The repetition in these makes them oddly satisfying to look at.
nothingbutthedreams:

ryanpanos:

Inhabiting Infrastructures: Indian Stepwells | Socks Studio
The stepwells are generally storage and irrigation tanks in which sets of steps must be descended in order to reach for water and maintain the well itself. These structures are mostly common in western India and in arid regions of South Asia where they provide regular supply in regions affected by heavy seasonal fluctuations in water availability.
The stepwells, (the erliest date to 600 AD), essentially appear as infrastructural monuments for water collection, huge artifacts somewhere between landscape and architecture sunken in the earth. They are usually composed of two constant elements, a well and an access route: the well collects monsoon rain percolating through layers of fine silt (to filter particulates), eventually reaching a layer of impermeable clay. The second elements, the staircases, are descended to reach water and allow the use of the infrastructure. There are no two identical stepwells, as each one of them, – about 3000 were built -, reveals specific features in the shape and in the decorative motives; in some cases the stepwells host galleries and chambers around the well.

The repetition in these makes them oddly satisfying to look at.
nothingbutthedreams:

ryanpanos:

Inhabiting Infrastructures: Indian Stepwells | Socks Studio
The stepwells are generally storage and irrigation tanks in which sets of steps must be descended in order to reach for water and maintain the well itself. These structures are mostly common in western India and in arid regions of South Asia where they provide regular supply in regions affected by heavy seasonal fluctuations in water availability.
The stepwells, (the erliest date to 600 AD), essentially appear as infrastructural monuments for water collection, huge artifacts somewhere between landscape and architecture sunken in the earth. They are usually composed of two constant elements, a well and an access route: the well collects monsoon rain percolating through layers of fine silt (to filter particulates), eventually reaching a layer of impermeable clay. The second elements, the staircases, are descended to reach water and allow the use of the infrastructure. There are no two identical stepwells, as each one of them, – about 3000 were built -, reveals specific features in the shape and in the decorative motives; in some cases the stepwells host galleries and chambers around the well.

The repetition in these makes them oddly satisfying to look at.
nothingbutthedreams:

ryanpanos:

Inhabiting Infrastructures: Indian Stepwells | Socks Studio
The stepwells are generally storage and irrigation tanks in which sets of steps must be descended in order to reach for water and maintain the well itself. These structures are mostly common in western India and in arid regions of South Asia where they provide regular supply in regions affected by heavy seasonal fluctuations in water availability.
The stepwells, (the erliest date to 600 AD), essentially appear as infrastructural monuments for water collection, huge artifacts somewhere between landscape and architecture sunken in the earth. They are usually composed of two constant elements, a well and an access route: the well collects monsoon rain percolating through layers of fine silt (to filter particulates), eventually reaching a layer of impermeable clay. The second elements, the staircases, are descended to reach water and allow the use of the infrastructure. There are no two identical stepwells, as each one of them, – about 3000 were built -, reveals specific features in the shape and in the decorative motives; in some cases the stepwells host galleries and chambers around the well.

The repetition in these makes them oddly satisfying to look at.
nothingbutthedreams:

ryanpanos:

Inhabiting Infrastructures: Indian Stepwells | Socks Studio
The stepwells are generally storage and irrigation tanks in which sets of steps must be descended in order to reach for water and maintain the well itself. These structures are mostly common in western India and in arid regions of South Asia where they provide regular supply in regions affected by heavy seasonal fluctuations in water availability.
The stepwells, (the erliest date to 600 AD), essentially appear as infrastructural monuments for water collection, huge artifacts somewhere between landscape and architecture sunken in the earth. They are usually composed of two constant elements, a well and an access route: the well collects monsoon rain percolating through layers of fine silt (to filter particulates), eventually reaching a layer of impermeable clay. The second elements, the staircases, are descended to reach water and allow the use of the infrastructure. There are no two identical stepwells, as each one of them, – about 3000 were built -, reveals specific features in the shape and in the decorative motives; in some cases the stepwells host galleries and chambers around the well.

The repetition in these makes them oddly satisfying to look at.
nothingbutthedreams:

ryanpanos:

Inhabiting Infrastructures: Indian Stepwells | Socks Studio
The stepwells are generally storage and irrigation tanks in which sets of steps must be descended in order to reach for water and maintain the well itself. These structures are mostly common in western India and in arid regions of South Asia where they provide regular supply in regions affected by heavy seasonal fluctuations in water availability.
The stepwells, (the erliest date to 600 AD), essentially appear as infrastructural monuments for water collection, huge artifacts somewhere between landscape and architecture sunken in the earth. They are usually composed of two constant elements, a well and an access route: the well collects monsoon rain percolating through layers of fine silt (to filter particulates), eventually reaching a layer of impermeable clay. The second elements, the staircases, are descended to reach water and allow the use of the infrastructure. There are no two identical stepwells, as each one of them, – about 3000 were built -, reveals specific features in the shape and in the decorative motives; in some cases the stepwells host galleries and chambers around the well.

The repetition in these makes them oddly satisfying to look at.
nothingbutthedreams:

ryanpanos:

Inhabiting Infrastructures: Indian Stepwells | Socks Studio
The stepwells are generally storage and irrigation tanks in which sets of steps must be descended in order to reach for water and maintain the well itself. These structures are mostly common in western India and in arid regions of South Asia where they provide regular supply in regions affected by heavy seasonal fluctuations in water availability.
The stepwells, (the erliest date to 600 AD), essentially appear as infrastructural monuments for water collection, huge artifacts somewhere between landscape and architecture sunken in the earth. They are usually composed of two constant elements, a well and an access route: the well collects monsoon rain percolating through layers of fine silt (to filter particulates), eventually reaching a layer of impermeable clay. The second elements, the staircases, are descended to reach water and allow the use of the infrastructure. There are no two identical stepwells, as each one of them, – about 3000 were built -, reveals specific features in the shape and in the decorative motives; in some cases the stepwells host galleries and chambers around the well.

The repetition in these makes them oddly satisfying to look at.